Ask the Expert: Thank You Note Etiquette

by Ryan Conner | May 15, 2013

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Thanks to contemporary etiquette expert Bren Underwood from Must Bring Buns for answering this week’s reader question:

I’m having an extremely large wedding – 600 guests – and so we’re anticipating quite a few gifts. Do I still need to write thank you notes for every gift or is a verbal thank you acceptable?






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Wedding Etiquette Advice from Peggy Post

by Ryan Conner | October 24, 2012

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We have a very special “Ask the Expert” today. Peggy Post was in town last week for an event we co-hosted with The Adolphus and Paper & Chocolate. Peggy, Emily Post’s great-grandaughter-in-law, is the director of the the Emily Post Institute. She is the author of more than a dozen etiquette books, including the new 18th edition of Emily Post’s Etiquette. She publishes her advice in a biweekly online column for the New York Times called “The Well-Mannered Wedding” and a monthly column for Good Housekeeping.

At the tea, Peggy answered our burning etiquette questions including “How do I choose my wedding party?” and “Do I have to invite every cousin in my family?” She has graciously offered to recap some of the most popular questions and answers from the event. Read the advice after the jump.






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Engagement Party Etiquette: Gifts or No Gifts?

by Kristin Hull | June 6, 2012

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Certified wedding planner, Kathy Gillard, owner of Plan It With Me answers this week’s reader question:

Do guests usually bring gifts to an engagement party? Is it ok for us to say “no gifts” on the invitation?

“It is absolutely okay to put “no gifts” on the invitation. Suggested wording could be “no gifts please” or “no gifts, your presence is gift enough.”

It’s worthy to note that even if you do indicate “no gifts,” some guests are just more comfortable with bringing one. That means you will still need to write a thank you card for their thoughtfulness. Just because you said “no gifts” doesn’t mean you’re off the hook for the timeless tradition of appreciation.

I have had people ask if it is okay to register for an engagement party and that answer is simple……no.”






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The Difference Between a Matron of Honor and a Maid of Honor Is…

by Kristin Hull | May 30, 2012

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Thanks to StarDust Celebrations’ co-owner and wedding planner, Marsha Ballard French, for answering this week’s reader question:

What is the difference between a Maid of Honor and a Matron of Honor?

“The Maid of Honor refers to a bride’s honor attendant who is NOT married. The Matron of Honor refers to one who is married. Honor attendants are usually a best friend or sister. Recently though, some brides have selected their mother for this role. It is perfectly fine to use the term “Honor Attendant” and leave off the title of Maid or Matron if that works better for you. A couple of clever twists: If the bride choses a male friend as an honor attendant that person is referred to as a Man of Honor. If a groom chooses a female as an honor attendant, we usually refer to that person as a Best Woman.”






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How To Handle Uncooperative Bridesmaids

by Kristin Hull | December 14, 2011

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Thanks to Kimberly Schlegel Whitman, etiquette expert and author of The Wedding Workbook: A Time Saving Guide for the Busy Bride, for answering this week’s reader question.

My bridesmaids have done nothing to help me with my wedding. Maybe I’m not clear on what they’re supposed to be doing so – can you tell me what they should be doing and how do I get them to do it?

Being a bridesmaid is such an honor but it can baffle a young lady if she doesn’t know exactly what is required of her. Every bride expects something different from her bridesmaids so that can be confusing too! The best thing you can do, as the bride, is to communicate and clarify both what they can do to help and how much fun you are all going to have together. Here are some tips on how to make it all go smoothly:






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